Astronomía
Astronomía
Active Galactic Nuclei

Active Galactic Nuclei

'The connection between iron line emission and large-scale material can be spatially resolved directly only in nearby galaxies, but could be inferred in more distant AGNs by a connection between line emission and star-forming gas and dust that is more extended than the pc-scale torus. Here we present the results from a stacking analysis and X-ray spectral fitting performed on sources in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) 7 Ms observations. From the deep stacked spectra, we select sources with stellar mass log(M/M)>10 at 0.5<z<2, obtaining 25 sources with high infrared luminosity (SFRFIR≥17Myr−1) and 32 sources below this threshold. We find that the equivalent width of the iron line EW(Fe) is a factor of three higher with 3σ significance for high infrared luminosity measured from Herschel observations, indicating a connection between iron line emission and star-forming material on galaxy scales. We show that there is no significant dependence in EW(Fe) on M or X-ray luminosity, suggesting the reflection of AGN X-ray emission over large scales in their host galaxies may be widespread'.

'We wish to address the nature of these - seemingly radio-silent - X-ray-luminous AGN and their host galaxies: is there any radio emission, and if so, where does it originate? Focusing on the GOODS-N field, we examine the nature of these objects employing stacking techniques on ultra-deep radio data obtained with the JVLA. We combine these radio data with Spitzer far-infrared data. We establish the absence, or totally insignificant contribution of jet-driven radio-emission in roughly half of the otherwise normal population of X-ray luminous AGN, which appear to reside in normal star-forming galaxies. We conclude that AGN- or jet-driven radio emission is simply a mechanism that may be at work or may be dormant in galaxies with actively accreting black holes. The latter can be classified as radio-silent AGN'.

'We discuss the possible origin of the double-peaked profiles recently observed in Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs) at the epoch of reionization (z ≳ 6.5) from obscured active galactic nuclei (AGN). In combining the extent of the Lyman-α near-zones estimated from the blue peak velocity offset in these galaxies, with the ionizing emissivity of quasars at z ≳ 6, we forecast the intrinsic UV and X-ray luminosities of the AGN needed to give rise to their double-peaked profiles'. 

'The relaxed cool-core Phoenix cluster (SPT-CL J2344-4243) features an extremely strong cooling flow, as well as a mini halo. Strong star formation in the brightest cluster galaxy indicates that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback has been unable to inhibit this cooling flow'. 

Active Galactic Nuclei

'The dipping source XB 1916-053 is a compact binary system with an orbital period of 50 min harboring a neutron star. Using ten new {\it Chandra} observations and one {\it Swift/XRT} observation, we are able to extend the baseline of the orbital ephemeris; this allows us to exclude some models that explain the dip arrival times. The Chandra observations provide a good plasma diagnostic of the ionized absorber and allow us to determine whether it is placed at the outer rim of the accretion disk or closer to the compact object. From the available observations we are able to obtain three new dip arrival times extending the baseline of the orbital ephemeris from 37 to 40 years'. 

'We present new LOFAR observations of the massive merging galaxy cluster MACS J0717.5+3745. The cluster hosts the most powerful radio halo known to date. These new observations, in combination with published uGMRT (300−850 MHz) and VLA (1−6.5 GHz) data, reveal that the halo is more extended than previously thought, with a largest linear size of ∼2.2Mpc (...) We suggest that such a strong scattering may be a consequence of the regime where inverse Compton dominate the energy losses of electrons. The spectral index becomes steeper and shows an increased curvature in the outermost regions of the halo. We combined the radio data with \textit{Chandra} observations to investigate the connection between the thermal and non-thermal components of the intracluster medium (ICM). Despite a significant substructure in the halo emission, the radio brightness correlates strongly with the X-ray brightness at all observed frequencies'. 

Créditos: VLA©. 'Caltech.edu’. Banco de imágenes libres (excepto los reseñados).

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